Thoughts on how to create a well-designed garden retreat.

Hold your water!


We are currently in a drought here in Durham, NC.  This is particularly worrisome as it is still winter and winter time is when the lakes get re-filled and the soil moisture gets recharged.  We did have some storms last night which helped but heavy quick rain runs off more than it soaks in.  The question is how to catch some of the water instead of it running into the storm sewers.

One very common thing is to use rain barrels.  Rain barrels are placed under a downspout to catch roof water.  The downside of rain barrels is they are relatively small and therefore don’t hold all that much water.  When they are full, the water still needs to go somewhere.  Often times they are not attractive.  They also need to be located at a high point on the property to allow gravity to send the water where you want it when you need it via a hose.  They are better than nothing.

Another increasingly more popular option is to install cisterns underground.  These can hold a lot of water to be used later in the season when it is dry.  Water from the downspouts off the roof is piped into the cisterns.  A pump is then used to pump the water out when you need it.  The downside to cisterns is their initial cost and finding a space to put them.  I have seen collapsible tanks that can be placed under your crawl space or deck.  These are a little more affordable solution.

If you can’t collect the water in holding tanks, then a garden pond can be used.  This is what I do in Jaliya’s Garden.  My downspouts are piped to the pond and the pond fills up with a rain.  When the pond is full, it overflows into an area planted with plants that don’t mind being very wet at times.  I call this area my “wet meadow”.  A similar effect can be done where water runs off your driveway to create a “rain garden”.  Water flowing into the rain garden is slowed down from going further, however, during heavy rains, the excess still has to go somewhere.

Some of the plants in our area that work for rain gardens are Joe-Pye Weed, Monarda, Cardinal flower, native Ageratum, rain lily, Virginia iris, Louisiana iris, Swamp sunflower.  Some shrubs also like wet areas such as Virginia Sweetspire, Inkberry Holly, Florida Anise, just to name a few.  The idea is to take advantage of low wet areas and plant the plants that appreciate such conditions.  In doing so, you can also keep some of the water that falls on your property from just going down the storm sewer doing you no good at all.

This water garden was built to take advantage of the water flow in the garden and turn a muddy spot into an attractive feature.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s